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Chinese Cinema

Identity, Power, and Globalization

(中國電影中的身份認同、權力及全球化論述)

Edited by Jeff Kyong-McClain, Russell Meeuf, and Jing Jing Chang

ISBN : 978-988-8528-53-0


Film, Media, Fine Arts Crossings: Asian Cinema and Media Culture

July 2022

268 pages, 6″ x 9″, 20 b&w illus.


Hardback
  • HK$650.00

In Chinese Cinema: Identity, Power, and Globalization, a variety of scholars explore the history, aesthetics, and politics of Chinese cinema as the Chinese film industry grapples with its place as the second largest film industry in the world. Exploring the various ways that Chinese cinema engages with global politics, market forces, and film cultures, this edited volume places Chinese cinema against an array of contexts informing the contours of Chinese cinema today. The book also demonstrates that Chinese cinema in the global context is informed by the intersections and tensions found in Chinese and world politics, national and international co-productions, the local and global in representing Chineseness, and the lived experiences of social and political movements versus screened politics in Chinese film culture. This work is a pioneer investigation of the topic and will inspire future research by other scholars of film studies. 

Jeff Kyong-McClain is an associate professor in the Department of History, University of Idaho.

Russell Meeuf is a professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Media, University of Idaho.

Jing Jing Chang is an associate professor of film studies at Wilfrid Laurier University.


Contributors:

Qi Ai, Shandong University

Katherine Chu, California State University

Lin Feng, University of Leicester

Po-Shek Fu, University of Illinois

Alison M. Groppe, University of Oregon

Belinda Q. He, University of Maryland

Yushi Hou, University of Southampton

Joseph Tse-Hei Lee, Pace University

Shiying Liu, University of Nottingham

Xi W. Liu, University of Sheffield

Kenny Kwok Kwan Ng, Hong Kong Baptist University

Stanley Rosen, University of Southern California

Wendy Su, University of California Riverside

Man-Fung Yip, University of Oklahoma

“This edited volume offers a much-needed account of alternative ways of envisioning Chinese cinema in the special context of China and the world. Its vigorous theoretical framework, which puts emphasis on interactions in the context of China and the world, will complement and update publications in related areas.”
Yiu-Wai Chu, The University of Hong Kong; author of Main Melody Films: Hong Kong Directors in Mainland China

Chinese Cinema: Identity, Power, and Globalization offers a collection of studies of modern Chinese films and their global connections, with a contemporary emphasis. Its authors’ insightful analyses of films—famous, obscure, and new to the twenty-first-century screen—elucidate numerous contextual factors relevant for understanding the history and aesthetics of Chinese cinemas.”
Christopher Rea, The University of British Columbia; author of Chinese Film Classics, 1922–1949