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Heritage and History in the China–Australia Migration Corridor

(中澳移民長廊歷史與承傳)

Edited by Denis Byrne, Ien Ang, and Phillip Mar

ISBN : 978-988-8805-62-4


Crossing Seas

February 2023

292 pages, 9″ x 6″, 46 b&w illus.


Hardback
  • HK$700.00
Forthcoming

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Heritage and History in the China–Australia Migration Corridor traces the material and social legacy of migration from China to Australia from the 1840s until the present day. The volume offers a multidimensional examination of the material footprint of migration as it exists at either end of the migration corridor stretching between Zhongshan county in south China and Australia. Spanning the fields of heritage studies, migration studies, and Chinese diaspora history, Denis Byrne, Ien Ang, Phillip Mar, and the other contributors foreground a transnational approach to the history and heritage of migration, one that takes account of the flows of people, ideas, objects, and money that circulate through migration corridors, forming intricate ongoing bonds between those who migrated to Australia and their home villages in China.

Denis Byrne is a professor of archaeology and heritage studies at the Institute for Culture and Society, Western Sydney University.

Ien Ang is a distinguished professor of cultural studies at the Institute for Culture and Society, Western Sydney University.

Phillip Mar is an anthropologist and adjunct researcher at the Institute for Culture and Society, Western Sydney University.

‘This is an excellent new addition to the growing literature on the history, heritage, and archaeology of the Chinese diaspora and transnational Chinese migration. This book is poised to be a major contribution to the history and heritage of the Chinese diaspora.’

—Barbara L. Voss, Stanford University

‘The quality of the research and writing is very high, and the theoretical framing is sophisticated and original. This book makes a much-needed contribution to overseas Chinese heritage studies, Chinese Australian history, transnational theory, and migration history. It also provides a model for how to work respectfully and successfully with descendants and community.’

—Sophie Loy-Wilson, University of Sydney